Sub-Saharan African Immigrants in the United States

Slightly more than 2 million immigrants from sub-Saharan Africa lived in the United States in 2018. While this population remains small, representing just 4.5 percent of the country’s 44.7 million immigrants, it is a rapidly growing one. Between 2010 and 2018, the sub-Saharan African population increased by 52 percent, significantly outpacing the 12 percent growth rate for the overall foreign-born population during that same period.

There were very few sub-Saharan Africans in the United States just a few decades ago, with under 150,000 residents in 1980. Since then, immigrants from some of the largest sub-Saharan countries, such as Nigeria, Ethiopia, Ghana, Somalia, and South Africa, have settled in the United States. Overall, more than 2 million immigrants have come from the 51 countries that comprise sub-Saharan Africa, making up 84 percent of the 2.4 million immigrants from the entire African continent. The remainder are from the six countries of North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia. MORE

Angela Okafor, who has a law degree from her home country of Nigeria and passed the New York bar exam, opened an immigration law practice three years ago.

Last month, Okafor made history in the larger community: The attorney and small-business owner became the first immigrant and black elected as a councilor in the small, overwhelmingly white city. Okafor’s election is part of a growing wave of women of color who are running for political office, and winning.

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Washington DC – Job Seekers Clinic

Are you looking for a job? Do you need help with your cover letter, resume or application?

Come to Job Seekers Clinics at Petworth Library! Library staff will provide one-on-one assistance for job seeking patrons. Patrons will be served on a first-come, first-serve basis. Job Seeker Clinics will occur every 2nd and 4th Wednesday of the month from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Where: Petworth Library | 4200 Kansas Ave. NW | Washington, D.C. | 20011

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PORTRAIT (Togo) – Harvard Kennedy School: A Vision in Togo: Cina Lawson MPP 2001 uses technology to transform financial inclusion and internet access in this West African nation

2019 Recipient Public Service Award

CINA LAWSON MPP 2001 FIRST MET the president of Togo when he visited New York for the United Nations General Assembly in 2009. She was working in Manhattan, developing data infrastructure services for Orange Business Services’ public- and private-sector clients, and the two discussed the challenges and opportunities facing the telecom sector in West Africa.

When President Faure Gnassingbé was reelected in 2010, he remembered their conversation and asked Lawson to join his government as the minister of posts, digital economy, and technological innovation. Since assuming that position, she has significantly expanded access to both the internet and financial services in Togo.

Internet Scholarship Guide

Si vous considérez des études aux Etats-Unis, visitez ces sites sur les bourses d’études:

The Goldwater Scholarship – https://goldwater.scholarsapply.org/

Scholarships.com – https://www.scholarships.com/

College Scholarships.com – http://www.collegescholarships.com

CollegeQuest – http://www.collegequest.com/

The Rhodes Scholarships – http://www.rhodesscholar.org/

The Jackie Robinson Foundation – http://www.jackierobinson.org/

The Gates Millennium Scholars (GMS) Program – https://gmsp.org/

The Fulbright Scholar Program – https://www.cies.org/

IEFA – https://www.iefa.org/

The Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation – https://www.mcsf.org

Pour les Haïtiens – 2019 call for Research Fellow Applications

Research Fellow Program for the Office of Evaluation and Oversight-1900000828

Description

Background: The Office of Evaluation and Oversight (OVE) at the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is seeking several Research Fellows (RF) to work at IDB Headquarters in Washington, D.C. OVE is an independent evaluation office that conducts project, program and corporate evaluations of IDB’s and IDB Invest’s activities and reports directly to these institutions’ Boards.

BIOGRAPHIE – Susan Rice

Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For

In her new book Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For, Susan E. Rice—National Security Advisor to President Barack Obama and U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations—reveals her surprising story with unflinching candor as she recalls pivotal moments from her dynamic career on the front lines of American diplomacy and foreign policy. 

Mother, wife, scholar, diplomat, and fierce champion of American interests and values, Rice powerfully connects the personal and the professional. Taught early, with tough love, how to compete and excel as an African American woman in settings where people of color are few, Rice shares the wisdom she learned along the way.

Laying bare the family struggles that shaped her early life in Washington, DC, she also examines the ancestral legacies that influenced her. Rice’s elders—immigrants on one side and descendants of slaves on the other—had high expectations that each generation would rise. And rise they did, but not without paying it forward—in uniform and in the pulpit, as educators, community leaders, and public servants.

Rice, who served throughout the Clinton administration, became one of the nation’s youngest assistant secretaries of state and, later, one of President Obama’s most trusted advisors.

She provides an insider’s account of some of the most complex issues confronting the United States over three decades, ranging from “Black Hawk Down” in Somalia to the genocide in Rwanda and the East Africa embassy bombings in the late 1990s, and from conflicts in Libya and Syria to the Ebola epidemic, a secret channel to Iran, and the opening to Cuba during the Obama years. She reveals previously untold stories behind recent national security challenges, including confrontations with Russia and China, the war against ISIS, the struggle to contain the fallout from Edward Snowden’s NSA leaks, the U.S. response to Russian interference in the 2016 election, and the transition to the Trump administration.

REVIEWS

Catholic Relief Services’ International Development Fellowship (Nov 1 deadline)

Catholic Relief Services’ (CRS) International Development Fellows Program is a 12-month professional development opportunity, designed for individuals dedicated to a career in international relief and development.

CRS is one of the largest and most trusted international relief and development organizations. In more than 100 countries worldwide, CRS promotes transformative and sustainable change by using holistic approaches, engaging people at all levels, and tailoring our work to the needs of the people we serve.

Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders 2020 (Fully-funded)

The Mandela Washington Fellowship will bring up to 700 young leaders to the United States in the summer of 2020 for a comprehensive executive-style program that is designed to build skills and empower Fellows to lead in their respective sectors and communities. The application is now open and will close on October 9, 2019


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