The 15 Master’s Degrees With the Best Return on Investment

Going to grad school is expensive: more than half of master’s degree students leave school with an average student loan balance of $66,000, according to federal statistics.

Sure, getting your master’s degree can pave the way to a bump in your pay, but a higher salary won’t give you more spending power if you’re also paying down tons of debt. On the other hand, a large debt load isn’t as crushing if you’re earning six figures. Experts often suggest that for student debt payments to be affordable, they need to be below about 10% to 15% of your monthly income. That’s why it’s smart to look at both the typical debt and salary of students graduating from a particular program to determine whether it’ll pay off.

To help with your research, Money analyzed the average student debt and earnings from graduates of over 200 master’s degrees at more than 1,500 colleges, to see which ones have the best early return on investment. For more details on how we got these results, check out the methodology at the end.

1. Electrical Engineering

  • Average debt: $25,762
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $98,880
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 3.2%

This degree snags the top spot with a debt-to-income ratio that is lower than nearly every other program in the dataset. With a master’s in electrical or electronics engineering, you can specialize in communication systems, power systems, and renewable energy. A graduate degree can also help you move toward management roles in the field. Graduates are in high demand in growing industries, including energy and technology.

2. Mechanical Engineering

  • Average debt: $30,611
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $83,705
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 4.4%

If designing and building machinery is something you dream about, then a master’s in mechanical engineering could be a solid fit for you — even if you studied another field as an undergrad. Although a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering is preferred, most schools will allow other disciplines that require heavy math and science courses to apply for this track, including physics and aerospace majors. Mechanical engineers can specialize in areas as wide-ranging as robotics, auto research, and heating and cooling systems.

3. Taxation

  • Average debt: $29,000
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $76,806
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 4.7%

This program is just what it sounds like: you’ll learn the ins and outs of state, federal, corporate, and individual tax regulations. But that doesn’t mean your career prospects will be limited to tax prep or auditing. This degree also serves as training for roles like a financial manager, certified public accountant (CPA) or chief financial officer — all of which have a high earning potential.

4. Civil Engineering

  • Average debt: $29,643
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $73,650
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 4.9%

Civil engineers have been around since ancient times (Roman aqueducts, anyone?) and are responsible for some of the world’s most recognizable structures, like the Eiffel Tower and the Golden Gate Bridge. But the field is anything but antiquated. Newer specializations, like intelligent systems engineering, involve designing eco-friendly and technology-powered structures and systems. Regardless of your specialty, a master’s degree in civil engineering can increase your earnings by almost $14,000 a year over a bachelor’s degree, according to the American Society of Civil Engineers.

5. Management Sciences and Quantitative Methods

  • Average debt: $40,426
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $87,924
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 5.9%

Calling all numbers nerds: This degree will prepare you to collect, analyze and manage data to help businesses and organizations solve problems. You’ll be able to work as an actuary, financial analyst, insurance underwriter, or as a statistician, which is one of the fastest-growing occupations, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

6. Clinical Nursing/Nursing Administration

  • Average debt: $49,052
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $99,358
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 6.1%

Nursing is one of those fields where you really don’t need to go to grad school. A bachelor’s degree will net you job security and a solid salary. But if you want to teach nursing, work as a nurse administrator or practice in a specialized field like anesthesiology or pediatrics, then a master’s is a must. Besides having one of the highest salaries on our list, nurses are also in extremely high demand. So much so that the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the profession will experience a 45% growth over the next eight years.

7. Bioethics/Medical Ethics

  • Average debt: $36,408
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $76,534
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 6.3%

Bioethics is an interdisciplinary field that combines combines tenets of medicine, law, philosophy and sociology. The goal is to train people to, for example, advise on the design of clinical trials to ensure they’re ethical. Day-to-day tasks include heavy research, interviewing and writing. Although it’s a relatively small field, it is a growing profession. You’ll be able to work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, universities and government agencies.

8. Accounting

  • Average debt: $31,273
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $60,140
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 6.6%

There’s a longstanding (and maybe now, cliched) line of jokes about accountants being boring. But with solid career prospects and above-average salaries, maybe it’s the accountants who are getting the last laugh. A master’s degree in the field can prep you to become a CPA, as well as the lesser-known certified management accountant. You can even work in fields that sound the opposite of boring, like forensic accounting or fraud examination.

9. Business Administration and Business/Commerce

  • Average debt: $38,673 – $38,731
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $69,384 – $77,164
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 6.6% – 7.2%

If you’re looking for a degree that’s flexible and can help you set foot in almost any industry — look no further. With a master’s degree in business administration or business and commerce, which we’ve combined into a single entry here, you can specialize in multiple areas, including marketing, supply chain management and finance. You can also work in fields as wide-ranging as health care or fashion. With so many paths to choose from, it should be no surprise that business is one of the most common graduate degree programs.

10. Computer Sciences and Information Technology Administration Management

  • Average debt: $41,597 – $50,318
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $77,636 – $84,437
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 7% – 7.4%

A greater emphasis on cloud computing, data collection and storage, and information security is going to drive serious demand for people with training in this area. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that job openings for computer science and IT management, which we’ve combined into a single listing here, will grow by 11% over the next decade, far above the average pace. The jobs will pay well, too: The National Association of Colleges and Employers places computer science graduates among the nation’s top earners.

11. Management Information Systems and Services

  • Average debt: $40,352
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $73,138
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 7%

Not to be confused with our 9th or 10th entries on the list, this degree is an interdisciplinary program that combines the principles of both 9 and 10 (that is, computer science with business and management). Graduates can get jobs in industries like accounting, finance, real estate, information technology and finance. Common job titles for this degree include senior technical business analyst, network administrator and IT infrastructure manager.

12. Homeland Security

  • Average debt: $37,401
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $64,721
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 7.5%

Are you a logistics wizard? Are you always ready to step up when others need it? Do you enjoy working under pressure and in an ever-changing environment? If you answered yes to all of the following, a degree in homeland security might interest you. The program preps students for the careers you’d expect: special agent, intelligence analyst and emergency disaster manager. But there’s also some more unexpected career paths, like working for the Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, which is the agency responsible for protecting our native species.

13. Medical Illustration and Informatics

  • Average debt: $42,379
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $74,903
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 7.5%

If you love both science and doodling, then let us introduce you to a field you may have never heard of: medical illustration. Medical illustrators are (among other things) the ones responsible for creating those detailed sketches you grew up seeing in science textbooks (flashbacks to the digestive system, anyone?). There’s not a specific major required to enter this program, but you must have a few science courses under your belt, plus an art portfolio. Medical illustrators can work in pharmaceuticals, publishing companies, and universities, and they can earn salaries as high as $173,000, according to the Association of Medical Illustrators.

14. Instructional Media Design

  • Average debt: $30,520
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $52,279
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 7.5%

The pandemic sent online education zooming (pun intended), but demand for instructional designers with a deep understand of online learning will persist even after in-person schooling returns. This program combines graphic design, technology and teaching principles to improve the way others learn. Teaching experience is often a pre-requisite for this degree, and after you graduate, you’ll be able to work as a distance education specialist, course design manager and instructional design coordinator.

15. Educational Administration and Supervision

  • Average debt: $31,369
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $53,729
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 7.7%

In the unlikely event that your childhood hero was your school’s principal, this program is for you. As an educational administration major, you’ll learn about education law, education budgeting and finance, strategic leadership, and staff management — in short, everything you need to run a school. To apply, you must have a state-issued teacher license, and in most cases, you’ll have to complete several internship or practicum hours to get your degree. MORE

L’Oréal USA Partners with the NAACP to Launch Its Inclusive Beauty Fund

L’Oréal USA today announced the creation of its Inclusive Beauty Fund, a new grant program presented in partnership with the NAACP, the largest and most pre-eminent civil rights organization in the nation. Through this inaugural round of funding, L’Oréal USA will award 30 one-time grants of $10,000 each to Black-owned small businesses, Black entrepreneurs, and professional services in all sectors of the U.S. beauty industry. 

As small businesses in America have been hit the hardest by the economic fallout of the pandemic and Black-owned businesses are shutting down twice as fast as others according to NBER, L’Oréal USA teamed up with the NAACP to identify the most promising Black-owned small businesses and entrepreneurs in the beauty industry that are most in need of investment.

“As the leading beauty company in the United States, we believe that we have a responsibility to invest in the small business owners and entrepreneurs who are the lifeblood of our dynamic beauty industry. We are proud to team up with the NAACP to advance our shared mission of creating a more inclusive and equitable world during this time of great economic vulnerability for so many. We hope the Inclusive Beauty Fund will introduce us to entrepreneurs in the beauty industry that we can build strong relationships with well into the future,” said Angela Guy, Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer, L’Oréal USA.

In addition to one-time funding, L’Oréal USA is committed to providing grantees with professional mentorship and business development support with the participation of top executives from its leading beauty brands and its professional beauty products distributor, SalonCentric. The Inclusive Beauty Fund is part of L’Oréal USA’s larger commitment to support the NAACP’s mission, which will include additional initiatives to be announced in the future.The initiative is backed by L’Oréal USA’s newly formed Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Board, who will work alongside the NAACP, L’Oréal USA, and SalonCentric leaders to review and select grant recipients. The Advisory Board, made up of up over 20 internal and external stakeholders, have come together to ideate as a collective on efforts to influence and reimagine social and inclusive strategies that support L’Oréal USA’sDiversity and Inclusion mission to build the standard in making beauty inclusive. 

“Black-owned small beauty businesses are the heartbeat of their neighborhoods, and beauty business owners are navigating tremendous challenges stemming from the Covid-19 and recent events. The NAACP is proud to partner with L’Oréal USA to help support these entrepreneurs and ensure the longevity of the services and community their businesses provide,” said Yumeka Rushing, Chief Strategy Officer, NAACP.

How to Apply

Applications for the Inclusive Beauty Fund will be administered by the NAACP in partnership with Hello Alice, a platform for small business owners to identify the right path to start and grow their company. Applications for the financial grants opens today January 29, and proceeds through February 18, 2021. All submissions must be conducted through Hello Alicehttps://hialice.co/LOreal-HelloAlice-Grant. The candidates selected to receive the grants will be announced in April of 2021.

Grants are available to new or existing beauty businesses of all kinds, including but not limited to salons, spas, barber shops, stylists, makeup artists, entrepreneurs, startup founders, haircare specialists, and beauty schools. MORE

BURUNDI – The star chemist

Growing up in Bujumbura, Burundi, Mireille Kamariza didn’t know any astronomers, or any scientists at all for that matter. But she adored planets anyway. At the start of every school year, she and her fellow students would wrap up their notebooks to protect them from wear. And every year, Kamariza hunted her town for magazines with glossy pictures of planets, astronauts, and “any news about astronomy.” Between classes, she stared at those astronomical covers like they were portals to a fantastical world.

The Junior Fellow never ended up floating among the stars, at least not in a literal sense. This August, Chemical & Engineering News named her one of its Talented 12 for her invention of a quick, low-cost test to detect tuberculosis. In 2017, Fortune magazine named her one of the World’s Most Powerful Women while she was still a graduate student. In 2018, she earned an even rarer title: co-founder of a company in the male-dominated biotech industry. In a way, the world she now inhabits — that of an award-winning scientist, Silicon Valley biotech entrepreneur, degree recipient from the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University — was a fantastical world, at least to that young girl in Burundi who got lost in pictures of Mars and Venus.

“It feels like a different life,” Kamariza said, “It’s nothing short of a miracle that I’m one of the few that was able to make that jump.”

After achieving the fantastical, Kamariza is tackling a very real problem: Throughout the developing world, including Burundi, tuberculosis is one of the top causes of death. In 2018, the disease killed 1.5 million worldwide, far more than even AIDS. Though testing and treatment are on the rise, low-income, rural populations still struggle to detect and contain the disease (especially now that COVID-19 diagnostics are prioritized over every other infectious disease). Each year, about 10 million people develop tuberculosis and about 3 million go undetected, Kamariza said. Her invention — a portable diagnostic tool — could help identify more cases faster, anywhere in the world, to prevent further spread, get treatment to those in need, and even monitor the effectiveness of that treatment. “A lot of people doing TB work were rewired to do COVID work. TB patients are being left behind.” — Mireille Kamariza, Junior Fellow

When Kamariza arrived in the U.S., settling in San Diego at age 17, science was still an alien thing. She spoke French but little English (she watched “Star Wars” and “Star Trek” to learn more); she shared a studio apartment with her two older brothers and worked part-time at Safeway while taking classes full-time at San Diego Mesa College. There, she left her love of planets behind: “How many astronauts do you know that started at a community college?” she said.

By chance, she enrolled in a chemistry course with Professor Saloua Saidane, who happened to speak French. She guided Kamariza over the language barrier before pushing her to transfer to the University of California, San Diego. Kamariza needed the encouragement: Other mentors told her, bluntly, that her English and G.P.A. were too poor for her to make it to UCSD. They were wrong.

Once at UCSD, Kamariza again doubted her ability to make it to graduate school. But Tracy Johnson — another chemist and the first Black woman scientist Kamariza encountered — pushed her to apply to the University of California, Berkeley. “I would never make it to UC Berkeley in a million years!” Kamariza said to Johnson. “Look at all the people who make it in. How many are African immigrants?”

Kamariza often credits external interventions like miracles, luck, and mentors for her success. “For immigrants, for people who come from backgrounds that are traditionally underserved,” she said, “it’s all about opportunities and it’s about who can open the door for you.” Still, though Johnson showed her the door, Kamariza knocked. To her surprise (but not Johnson’s), she got in.

At Berkeley, Kamariza joined Carolyn Bertozzi’s chemical biology lab. There, and continuing at Stanford University, she combined her knowledge of chemistry and molecular biology to eventually invent her tuberculosis diagnostic. Her test turned what used to be an 11-step process into one simple step. “Because it’s stable and because it doesn’t require a fridge to work,” Kamariza said, “you could in principle do this experiment anywhere. You could be in the tundra of Alaska or the desert of Namibia and do it.” MORE

USA – Updates for International Students

A flurry of confusing pandemic-related changes to immigration policy have international students struggling to understand how their visas and, ultimately, academic careers may be impacted by these troubling directives. This alert clarifies the most current policies impacting international students and which visa categories may be affected. As always, GYH attorneys are available for consultations to answer any questions you have about your immigration process.

Good News: Online-only Course Loads Allowed for International Students
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) on July 6th issued a directive that would have required international students to have at least some in-person classes in order to stay in the country. Last week, a swift lawsuit by Harvard and MIT, which argued the directive forced schools to choose between sacrificing international students and risking public health and safety, forced DHS to rescind the order.
The rescission of the directive restores the March 13 guidance permitting current students on F-1 visas to remain in the U.S. while taking online-only only course loads.
Unfortunately, newly enrolling international students are still not allowed to take online-only course loads but the case remains open and it is expected that the Trump Administration will also be asked to defend the restrictions facing newly-enrolled international students.

National Interest Exceptions to Schengen Travel Ban
The Department of State (DOS) announced that some students in the Schengen area, UK, and Ireland may qualify for a National Interest Exception (NIE). Students with valid F-1 or M-1 visas traveling from the Schengen Area, the UK and Ireland have been granted a blanket exception and do not have to take any special action to travel. Students travelling from these areas on J-1 visas should contact the nearest embassy or consulate to request a NIE.
Note that consular closures, which have been in place for months, largely remain in effect. Some posts are reportedly opening but, for the most part, we have seen little movement from these posts and few visas are being issued at this point.

SOURCE: https://www.grossmanyoung.com/

Why did I move to Ghana?

Ever since I relocated from Boston to Ghana in 2016, I regularly get asked a variation on the following question: “Why did you uproot your life and promising career path in the US and move on your own to Africa? You got your Ph.D. from MIT — I’m sure you must have had other options.”

The short answer is “Well, it certainly wasn’t my plan from the beginning! I knew embarrassingly little about Africa beforehand. I was getting attention around my work (My Ph.D. research is on exhibit at the MIT Museum– do visit if you’re in Boston!), and I did have job offers. But God challenged me to adopt a new framework for viewing the world and my role in it.”

The longer answer is multi-faceted, drawing from many aspects of my life experiences, and it continues to evolve along with the weaving of my life story. I can point to 4 main stages in my journey to/through/with Africa so far, and I’d love to take you through each of them. MORE

USA – Refus des visas aux étudiants étrangers : La Californie attaque la décision en justice

Après l’Université de Harvard, le MIT, l’Etat de Californie a déclaré vouloir poursuivre l’administration Trump devant le tribunal fédéral. L’Etat et ces universités cherchent à bloquer la directive qui priverait les étudiants étrangers de visas si les cours étaient entièrement en ligne. – Elles ont fait valoir que la mesure plongerait l’enseignement supérieur dans le chaos.

Pour rappel : – L’administration Trump a annoncé lundi qu’elle n’autoriserait pas les étudiants et élèves étrangers à rester aux Etats-Unis si leur université ou école décidait de proposer des cours uniquement en ligne à la rentrée de septembre. – Le gouvernement américain ne « donnera pas de visas aux étudiants inscrits dans des programmes intégralement en ligne à l’automne et les gardes-frontières ne les laisseront pas entrer sur le territoire », a annoncé la police de l’immigration et des douanes (ICE) dans un communiqué.

En résumé, les étudiants étrangers dont les campus ne rouvriront pas pour le semestre d’automne seront tenus de retourner dans leur pays d’origine, car leurs visas ne seront plus considérés comme valides.
IMPORTANT : Si vous êtes étudiant non-américain déjà présent sur le territoire américain, le communiqué précise : « ils doivent quitter le pays ou prendre d’autres mesures – comme s’inscrire dans une école proposant des cours « en présentiel sur site» pour conserver leur statut légal. Sinon, ils pourront « faire face à une procédure d’expulsion ».

– Quand les établissements opteront pour un modèle « hybride », avec des cours en ligne et des enseignements sur site, ils devront certifier que leurs étudiants étrangers sont bien inscrits pour des sessions assurées sur leur campus, afin que ceux-ci conservent leur droit de séjour. 
– Ces dérogations ne seront pas autorisées pour les études d’anglais ou pour des formations professionnelles.
– Les étudiants ont seulement 10 jours pour notifier le programme s’ils passent à des cours en ligne uniquement et probablement commencer le processus de quitter les États-Unis.
– La mesure concerne les visas F1 (pour des études académiques) ou M1 (pour des formations professionnelles)

Views of diverse students leaving class outside the Northwest Labs in Autumn. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

Les cartes vertes et de nombreux visas de travail pour les Etats-Unis gelés jusqu’en 2021

Donald Trump vient de prendre une énième décision au nom de la lutte contre le chômage. En campagne pour sa réélection le 3 novembre, le président américain a décidé, lundi 22 juin, de donner un nouveau tour de vis migratoire avec le gel des cartes vertes et de certains visas de travail jusqu’en 2021.

Confronté à la destruction brutale de millions d’emplois en raison des mesures de confinement, le président républicain avait décidé il y a deux mois de suspendre pour soixante jours la délivrance des Green Cards, qui offrent un statut de résident permanent aux Etats-Unis, sans toucher aux visas de travail temporaires. SUITE

Et aussi – Proclamation Suspending Entry of Aliens Who Present a Risk to the U.S. Labor Market Following the Coronavirus Outbreak

15 chaines de podcasts pour progresser en anglais

Le podcast est un format en plein boom. Pourquoi ? C’est simple: rien à regarder, rien à lire, on n’a qu’à écouter, et on peut les picorer au fil de nos envies car en plus ils sont gratuits.

Les podcasts pour apprendre une langue ont les mêmes avantages : se former facilement, où que l’on soit et éventuellement en faisant autre chose en même temps. Régalez-vous donc, dans votre voiture, dans les transports en commun, en faisant votre jogging, en sortant votre lessive, en cuisinant, ou tout ce que vous voudrez !

Et par rapport aux autres outils d’apprentissage linguistique qui manquent souvent de contenus audio, les podcasts ont le mérite de vous faire travailler la compréhension orale, et d’écouter différents accents anglophones.

L’inconvénient ? Un podcast est facile à enregistrer et tout le monde peut créer son contenu et le proposer gratuitement sur une plateformes hébergeant des podcasts. Le résultat n’est donc pas toujours de grande qualité, beaucoup de séries fleurissent pour aussitôt être arrêtées, et il n’est pas évident de repérer ceux qui vous rendront accro et vous feront donc réellement progresser. Pour vous aider, nous avons sélectionné 15 chaines de podcasts vraiment intéressantes, pour tous les niveaux. SUITE

USA – Information About the Presidential Proclamation Suspending Entry of Certain Immigrants

Yesterday evening the President issued a proclamation suspending the entry of immigrants for a period of 60 days.  The measure was first announced in a tweet sent out by the President on Monday night. Because we know that many of you are concerned as to whether and how this may affect you, we want to provide the following summary of the proclamation.

WHO:
The proclamation suspends entry of those seeking immigrant visas from outside of the United States.  It DOES NOT affect individuals that are in the United States and applying for adjustment of status.  It also does not apply to those seeking entry as non-immigrants, such as visitors (B-1/B-2), employees of intergovernmental organizations (G-4), students (F-1/J-1) and temporary workers (H-1B).  There are several EXCEPTIONS to the proclamation for:

  • Lawful permanent residents 
  • Physicians, nurses, or other healthcare professionals coming to perform medical research or other research intended to combat the spread of COVID-19; or to perform work essential to combating, recovering from, or otherwise alleviating the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak and their any spouses and unmarried children under 21 years old
  • EB-5 Immigrant Investors 
  • Spouses of a United States citizen
  • Children under 21 years old of a United States citizen
  • Members of law enforcement
  • Members of the United States Armed Forces and any spouse and children of a member of the United States Armed Forces
  • Special Immigrant Visa holders in the SI or SQ classification,and their spouse and children 
  • Anyone whose entry would be in the national interest
  • Individuals who have already been issued an immigrant visa

WHAT:
The proclamation is a temporary suspension on entry.  It is anticipated that application and processing steps that occur prior to the issuance of such immigrants will continue.  Once the proclamation is lifted or expired, those individuals will be allowed to enter the United States.
It should be noted that most US Consulates have already been closed and unable to conduct interviews due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

WHERE:
As noted above, this affects only those who are outside of the United States.

WHEN:
The proclamation went into effect at 11:59 PM April 23rd and is set to expire in 60 days.  It may be continued if deemed necessary.

  • SOURCE – https://bromberglaw.com/