MBA – Tech Companies That Won the Pandemic Are Snapping Up M.B.A.s

Amazon, Zoom and others swoop in with job offers as some of the biggest traditional hirers of business-school graduates pull back

Tech companies whose businesses have surged during the pandemic—like Amazon . com Inc. and Zoom Video Communications Inc. —are snagging more of the M.B.A. talent entering the workforce, helping to offset pullbacks by industries harder hit by the Covid-19 economy.

Openings for tech positions rose at 57% of full-time Masters of Business Administration programs this past fall, according to a survey of nearly 100 schools by industry group MBA Career Services & Employer Alliance. Overall, though, it has been a lackluster recruiting season at business schools, the survey found, as nearly half reported an overall decline in opportunities for students.

Sectors hit hardest by the pandemic, such as retail and energy, have pulled back their M.B.A. recruiting, according to the report. That is especially the case for companies in the hospitality industry, which 61% of business schools said have cut back job opportunities.

Nearly half the schools also reported a decline in recruiting from consulting firms—traditionally some of the biggest hirers of M.B.A. graduates every year. Several of those firms, including PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP and Bain & Co., said last year that they planned to make fewer hires among second-year M.B.A. candidates, beyond those who interned in the summer. MORE

The 15 Master’s Degrees With the Best Return on Investment

Going to grad school is expensive: more than half of master’s degree students leave school with an average student loan balance of $66,000, according to federal statistics.

Sure, getting your master’s degree can pave the way to a bump in your pay, but a higher salary won’t give you more spending power if you’re also paying down tons of debt. On the other hand, a large debt load isn’t as crushing if you’re earning six figures. Experts often suggest that for student debt payments to be affordable, they need to be below about 10% to 15% of your monthly income. That’s why it’s smart to look at both the typical debt and salary of students graduating from a particular program to determine whether it’ll pay off.

To help with your research, Money analyzed the average student debt and earnings from graduates of over 200 master’s degrees at more than 1,500 colleges, to see which ones have the best early return on investment. For more details on how we got these results, check out the methodology at the end.

1. Electrical Engineering

  • Average debt: $25,762
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $98,880
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 3.2%

This degree snags the top spot with a debt-to-income ratio that is lower than nearly every other program in the dataset. With a master’s in electrical or electronics engineering, you can specialize in communication systems, power systems, and renewable energy. A graduate degree can also help you move toward management roles in the field. Graduates are in high demand in growing industries, including energy and technology.

2. Mechanical Engineering

  • Average debt: $30,611
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $83,705
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 4.4%

If designing and building machinery is something you dream about, then a master’s in mechanical engineering could be a solid fit for you — even if you studied another field as an undergrad. Although a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering is preferred, most schools will allow other disciplines that require heavy math and science courses to apply for this track, including physics and aerospace majors. Mechanical engineers can specialize in areas as wide-ranging as robotics, auto research, and heating and cooling systems.

3. Taxation

  • Average debt: $29,000
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $76,806
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 4.7%

This program is just what it sounds like: you’ll learn the ins and outs of state, federal, corporate, and individual tax regulations. But that doesn’t mean your career prospects will be limited to tax prep or auditing. This degree also serves as training for roles like a financial manager, certified public accountant (CPA) or chief financial officer — all of which have a high earning potential.

4. Civil Engineering

  • Average debt: $29,643
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $73,650
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 4.9%

Civil engineers have been around since ancient times (Roman aqueducts, anyone?) and are responsible for some of the world’s most recognizable structures, like the Eiffel Tower and the Golden Gate Bridge. But the field is anything but antiquated. Newer specializations, like intelligent systems engineering, involve designing eco-friendly and technology-powered structures and systems. Regardless of your specialty, a master’s degree in civil engineering can increase your earnings by almost $14,000 a year over a bachelor’s degree, according to the American Society of Civil Engineers.

5. Management Sciences and Quantitative Methods

  • Average debt: $40,426
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $87,924
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 5.9%

Calling all numbers nerds: This degree will prepare you to collect, analyze and manage data to help businesses and organizations solve problems. You’ll be able to work as an actuary, financial analyst, insurance underwriter, or as a statistician, which is one of the fastest-growing occupations, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

6. Clinical Nursing/Nursing Administration

  • Average debt: $49,052
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $99,358
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 6.1%

Nursing is one of those fields where you really don’t need to go to grad school. A bachelor’s degree will net you job security and a solid salary. But if you want to teach nursing, work as a nurse administrator or practice in a specialized field like anesthesiology or pediatrics, then a master’s is a must. Besides having one of the highest salaries on our list, nurses are also in extremely high demand. So much so that the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the profession will experience a 45% growth over the next eight years.

7. Bioethics/Medical Ethics

  • Average debt: $36,408
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $76,534
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 6.3%

Bioethics is an interdisciplinary field that combines combines tenets of medicine, law, philosophy and sociology. The goal is to train people to, for example, advise on the design of clinical trials to ensure they’re ethical. Day-to-day tasks include heavy research, interviewing and writing. Although it’s a relatively small field, it is a growing profession. You’ll be able to work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, universities and government agencies.

8. Accounting

  • Average debt: $31,273
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $60,140
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 6.6%

There’s a longstanding (and maybe now, cliched) line of jokes about accountants being boring. But with solid career prospects and above-average salaries, maybe it’s the accountants who are getting the last laugh. A master’s degree in the field can prep you to become a CPA, as well as the lesser-known certified management accountant. You can even work in fields that sound the opposite of boring, like forensic accounting or fraud examination.

9. Business Administration and Business/Commerce

  • Average debt: $38,673 – $38,731
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $69,384 – $77,164
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 6.6% – 7.2%

If you’re looking for a degree that’s flexible and can help you set foot in almost any industry — look no further. With a master’s degree in business administration or business and commerce, which we’ve combined into a single entry here, you can specialize in multiple areas, including marketing, supply chain management and finance. You can also work in fields as wide-ranging as health care or fashion. With so many paths to choose from, it should be no surprise that business is one of the most common graduate degree programs.

10. Computer Sciences and Information Technology Administration Management

  • Average debt: $41,597 – $50,318
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $77,636 – $84,437
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 7% – 7.4%

A greater emphasis on cloud computing, data collection and storage, and information security is going to drive serious demand for people with training in this area. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that job openings for computer science and IT management, which we’ve combined into a single listing here, will grow by 11% over the next decade, far above the average pace. The jobs will pay well, too: The National Association of Colleges and Employers places computer science graduates among the nation’s top earners.

11. Management Information Systems and Services

  • Average debt: $40,352
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $73,138
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 7%

Not to be confused with our 9th or 10th entries on the list, this degree is an interdisciplinary program that combines the principles of both 9 and 10 (that is, computer science with business and management). Graduates can get jobs in industries like accounting, finance, real estate, information technology and finance. Common job titles for this degree include senior technical business analyst, network administrator and IT infrastructure manager.

12. Homeland Security

  • Average debt: $37,401
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $64,721
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 7.5%

Are you a logistics wizard? Are you always ready to step up when others need it? Do you enjoy working under pressure and in an ever-changing environment? If you answered yes to all of the following, a degree in homeland security might interest you. The program preps students for the careers you’d expect: special agent, intelligence analyst and emergency disaster manager. But there’s also some more unexpected career paths, like working for the Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, which is the agency responsible for protecting our native species.

13. Medical Illustration and Informatics

  • Average debt: $42,379
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $74,903
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 7.5%

If you love both science and doodling, then let us introduce you to a field you may have never heard of: medical illustration. Medical illustrators are (among other things) the ones responsible for creating those detailed sketches you grew up seeing in science textbooks (flashbacks to the digestive system, anyone?). There’s not a specific major required to enter this program, but you must have a few science courses under your belt, plus an art portfolio. Medical illustrators can work in pharmaceuticals, publishing companies, and universities, and they can earn salaries as high as $173,000, according to the Association of Medical Illustrators.

14. Instructional Media Design

  • Average debt: $30,520
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $52,279
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 7.5%

The pandemic sent online education zooming (pun intended), but demand for instructional designers with a deep understand of online learning will persist even after in-person schooling returns. This program combines graphic design, technology and teaching principles to improve the way others learn. Teaching experience is often a pre-requisite for this degree, and after you graduate, you’ll be able to work as a distance education specialist, course design manager and instructional design coordinator.

15. Educational Administration and Supervision

  • Average debt: $31,369
  • Average salary within two years of leaving school: $53,729
  • Average monthly debt-to-income ratio: 7.7%

In the unlikely event that your childhood hero was your school’s principal, this program is for you. As an educational administration major, you’ll learn about education law, education budgeting and finance, strategic leadership, and staff management — in short, everything you need to run a school. To apply, you must have a state-issued teacher license, and in most cases, you’ll have to complete several internship or practicum hours to get your degree. MORE

MBA Debt: Here’s How Much You’ll Have to Borrow to Go to Business School

If you want to boost your earning potential, switch industries, or sharpen your entrepreneurial skills, a master’s of business administration, or “MBA,” can help you do just that.

But MBAs don’t come cheap. Data from the National Center of Education Statistics show that more than half of MBA students take on student debt to finance their degree. The average student loan balance for graduates was $66,300 in 2016 — a number that has continued to increase, according to more recent reports.

MBA holders are also among the nation’s top earners. However, not every MBA grad commands a six-figure salary. Earnings fluctuate depending on your location and the industry you work in, which means the difficulty of paying off tens of thousands of dollars of debt will also vary.

Here’s what you should know about MBAs and student debt.

How Much Do MBAs Cost?

Applications to MBA programs increased in 2020, partly due to the pandemic recession. But that’s a reversal of what’s happened in the past several years, where applications have slowed as the high cost of business school, coupled with doubts about the value of an MBA, among other factors, drove some applicants away.

Stacey Koprince, lead of content and curriculum at Manhattan Prep, a test preparation agency, says that one of the reasons why business school is so expensive is because of the people teaching the courses.

“If you want to have professors who are not just academics, but who are actually in the business world themselves, then you’re gonna have to pay the kinds of salaries that they could be making if they were out running a business themselves,” Koprince says.

Business schools also spend large amounts on resources to help students with career placement, says Barbara Coward, a consultant at MBA 360 Admissions. That includes networking summits (sometimes out of town), seminars and individual counselors — all of which are rolled up into the programs’ overall cost.

So, how much does it cost to get an MBA? Here’s the average cost of tuition and fees for full-time residential programs by residency status, according to data provided by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB):

  • Resident students: $41,793
  • Nonresident students: $52,696

But tuition and fees are just the tip of the iceberg. The cost of relocation, books, supplies, and other miscellaneous expenses can set you back several thousand dollars more. MORE

USA – Updates for International Students

A flurry of confusing pandemic-related changes to immigration policy have international students struggling to understand how their visas and, ultimately, academic careers may be impacted by these troubling directives. This alert clarifies the most current policies impacting international students and which visa categories may be affected. As always, GYH attorneys are available for consultations to answer any questions you have about your immigration process.

Good News: Online-only Course Loads Allowed for International Students
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) on July 6th issued a directive that would have required international students to have at least some in-person classes in order to stay in the country. Last week, a swift lawsuit by Harvard and MIT, which argued the directive forced schools to choose between sacrificing international students and risking public health and safety, forced DHS to rescind the order.
The rescission of the directive restores the March 13 guidance permitting current students on F-1 visas to remain in the U.S. while taking online-only only course loads.
Unfortunately, newly enrolling international students are still not allowed to take online-only course loads but the case remains open and it is expected that the Trump Administration will also be asked to defend the restrictions facing newly-enrolled international students.

National Interest Exceptions to Schengen Travel Ban
The Department of State (DOS) announced that some students in the Schengen area, UK, and Ireland may qualify for a National Interest Exception (NIE). Students with valid F-1 or M-1 visas traveling from the Schengen Area, the UK and Ireland have been granted a blanket exception and do not have to take any special action to travel. Students travelling from these areas on J-1 visas should contact the nearest embassy or consulate to request a NIE.
Note that consular closures, which have been in place for months, largely remain in effect. Some posts are reportedly opening but, for the most part, we have seen little movement from these posts and few visas are being issued at this point.

SOURCE: https://www.grossmanyoung.com/

USA – Refus des visas aux étudiants étrangers : La Californie attaque la décision en justice

Après l’Université de Harvard, le MIT, l’Etat de Californie a déclaré vouloir poursuivre l’administration Trump devant le tribunal fédéral. L’Etat et ces universités cherchent à bloquer la directive qui priverait les étudiants étrangers de visas si les cours étaient entièrement en ligne. – Elles ont fait valoir que la mesure plongerait l’enseignement supérieur dans le chaos.

Pour rappel : – L’administration Trump a annoncé lundi qu’elle n’autoriserait pas les étudiants et élèves étrangers à rester aux Etats-Unis si leur université ou école décidait de proposer des cours uniquement en ligne à la rentrée de septembre. – Le gouvernement américain ne « donnera pas de visas aux étudiants inscrits dans des programmes intégralement en ligne à l’automne et les gardes-frontières ne les laisseront pas entrer sur le territoire », a annoncé la police de l’immigration et des douanes (ICE) dans un communiqué.

En résumé, les étudiants étrangers dont les campus ne rouvriront pas pour le semestre d’automne seront tenus de retourner dans leur pays d’origine, car leurs visas ne seront plus considérés comme valides.
IMPORTANT : Si vous êtes étudiant non-américain déjà présent sur le territoire américain, le communiqué précise : « ils doivent quitter le pays ou prendre d’autres mesures – comme s’inscrire dans une école proposant des cours « en présentiel sur site» pour conserver leur statut légal. Sinon, ils pourront « faire face à une procédure d’expulsion ».

– Quand les établissements opteront pour un modèle « hybride », avec des cours en ligne et des enseignements sur site, ils devront certifier que leurs étudiants étrangers sont bien inscrits pour des sessions assurées sur leur campus, afin que ceux-ci conservent leur droit de séjour. 
– Ces dérogations ne seront pas autorisées pour les études d’anglais ou pour des formations professionnelles.
– Les étudiants ont seulement 10 jours pour notifier le programme s’ils passent à des cours en ligne uniquement et probablement commencer le processus de quitter les États-Unis.
– La mesure concerne les visas F1 (pour des études académiques) ou M1 (pour des formations professionnelles)

Views of diverse students leaving class outside the Northwest Labs in Autumn. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

MBA – The prestigious Wharton business school’s new dean will be first woman and black in its nearly 140-year history

Erika James has a knack for making history.Five years after she was named the first African-American woman to be named dean of Emory University’s Goizueta Business School, James was named as the new dean at the University of Pennsylvania’s the Wharton School of Business.She’ll be the first woman and person of color to head the top business school in its 139-year history.”Erika is an award-winning scholar and teacher and a strong, proven leader who serves as dean of the Goizueta Business School at Emory University,” University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann said in a news release.”A passionate and visible champion of the power of business and business education to positively transform communities locally, nationally, and globally, she is exceptionally well prepared to lead Wharton into the next exciting chapter of its storied history,” she said.James was credited with growing Emory’s school faculty by 25% by the end of her first year, where she built an innovation and entrepreneurship lab that opened to all students. By last year the school had one of the most gender-diverse faculty populations in higher education, it said.”This is an exciting time to be in business education,” James said in the release. “The scope and platform of the Wharton School provides an opportunity to create far reaching impact for students, scholars, and the business community.”James served as the senior associate dean for executive education at the University of Virginia Darden School of Business prior to becoming the dean at Emory. She has a Ph.D. and master’s degree in organizational psychology from the University of Michigan, in Detroit and received a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Pomona College of the Claremont Colleges, in California. James will succeed Geoffrey Garrett, who became dean of the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business. MORE